Posts Tagged ‘Uganda’

KONY 2012–Make Him Famous

Please watch this and spread it around. When this half-hour video started showing up on facebook and Twitter via friends, I was intrigued, but told myself I didn’t have 30 minutes to watch some video.

I do have that time. You do, too. Please watch and act and share and talk about it. It matters.

DIG

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Cary Norton/Uganda

DIG (Development in Gardening) is a charitable organization dedicated to improving health and well-being for HIV-positive and at-risk individuals in developing nations. They teach skills and develop infrastructure for sustainable community gardens, thereby improving nutrition, wellness, and earning potential.

The garden projects (currently there are several DIG gardens in Uganda, Senegal, the Dominican Republic, and Namibia) are built and maintained by healthy HIV-affected workers, sometimes on hospital grounds. In addition to helping provide important, vitamin-rich fresh foods, the gardens also provide some income for the community as well as a welcoming gathering space. An offshoot of the program is HUG (Home Urban Garden) where individuals take the skills they have learned in hospital community gardens, and establish their own micro-gardens in previously unused spaces at or near their homes. This supplements the nutrition of entire families as well as a harvest of enough to sell fresh fruits and vegetables and help stabilize income.

Malnutrition in HIV/AIDS patients is a very real threat and almost constant condition in many economically challenged communities. This program not only nourishes individuals, but families and communities, and the skills shared by volunteers and staff can be passed on for generations to follow, potentially raising the level of health and nutrition for entire regions.

Want to get involved? Short term volunteers spend vacations at DIG projects, and longer-term volunteers work as interns taking stewardship of a program. Find out how to pitch in here.

http://www.developmentingardening.org

World Flix

Everybody loves their alma mater, and I have a stronger than average adoration for UC Santa Cruz, so I have a little extra bump of pride for a fellow alumna who is dedicated to changing the world, even though I’ve never met her. Laika Grant Mann has created WorldFlix.org, a new way to connect philanthropic donors with the communities they help around the world.

World Flix is an Internet-based non-profit with online video portals into communities at need. The library of mini-movies includes interviews with project recipients so donors across the world can see where their money goes, whether the need addressed is for clean drinking water, sustainable food sources, sanitation and safety, health care, or other ways to help. You can click over and see a short video about a Ugandan hospital’s need for mosquito nets, a Haitian community clean water project, Tibetan vision and eye-care centers, and more as projects partner up. 100% of the donations made through World Flix go to the recipient projects while grant money covers overhead. It creates a really lovely, easy connection much more so than a letter in the mail asking for donations and the impersonal process of sending a check to a faceless mailbox.

Connection = care. A great way to inspire giving.

As the website says, “See the Change You Wish to Make in the World

http://www.worldflix.org

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It Takes a Village

rwandaFXB, the Association Francois-Xavier Bagnoud, was named for a helicopter pilot who lost his life in service to others when his chopper crashed during a mission in Mali. The charity, founded by his mother, is dedicated to children of the world affected by HIV/AIDS and poverty. They support orphans and vulnerable children left in the wake of the pandemic and provide direct support to caregiving families and communities.

The past two decades have seen FXB help children by fortifying the social and economic capacities of the larger communities in which they live.

One of the most amazing initiatives of this organization is the FXB Village program. They set up entire communities where community-based responses to AIDS and poverty are driven and maintained by the village locals. There are 48 FXB Villages in the world…so far…4 in Burundi, 5 in India, 22 in Rwanda, 4 in Thailand, and 13 in Uganda. Each village serves 80-100 families (between 500 and 600 people, mostly children) delivering income producing programs, legal rights and advocacy, water and sanitation programs, education, health services, HIV prevention and treatment, and psycho-social support. There is a three-year intensive integration operation to then empower the villages to progress onward with lessening outside support and developing their own financial security.

It’s an extraordinary endeavor. Look into it. I’ve given the barest, skimpiest idea of the programs. Watch this 6-minute video to get a better idea.

You won’t lack inspiration after this–I promise